Compensatory Strategies for Central Auditory Processing Disorder
  • Beata Klarowska, M.S. CCC-SLP
  • Wednesday, February 03, 2016

Compensatory Strategies for Central Auditory Processing Disorder

Children and adults with central auditory processing disorder (CAPD) exhibit difficulty processing information presented verbally resulting in difficulties in language comprehension, following directions, and discriminating differences or similarities among speech sounds. CAPD makes learning new information very challenging. Learning a new word, as well as spelling and reading are also affected by CAPD....


What speech therapy homework should NOT be
  • Beata Klarowska, M.S. CCC-SLP
  • Friday, September 04, 2015

What speech therapy homework should NOT be

As speech and language pathologists, we all know that speech therapy homework is important because it facilitates generalization and expedites progress; however, it only does so when speech therapists assign it to students and their parents at the right time....


Free Articulation Worksheets
  • Beata Klarowska, M.S. CCC-SLP
  • Monday, October 13, 2014

Free Articulation Worksheets

Virtual Speech Center now offers free articulation worksheets on their website. All you have to do to get our worksheets is to register on our website. ...


Stroke to the right hemisphere of the brain – right hemisphere syndrome
  • Beata Klarowska, M.S. CCC-SLP
  • Monday, July 25, 2011

Stroke to the right hemisphere of the brain – right hemisphere syndrome

Right hemisphere syndrome is caused by injury to the right hemisphere of the brain. The brain is divided into the right and left hemispheres, which are each responsible for different functions. The left hemisphere is primarily responsible for language; the right hemisphere is primarily responsible for non-verbal communication, processing of visual, spatial, and cognitive-communicative information. ...


Speech and Language Development (Milestones)
  • Beata Klarowska, M.S. CCC-SLP
  • Monday, July 25, 2011

Speech and Language Development (Milestones)

Speech and language development begins very early, before a child says his or her first word. Early adult –infant interactions in the forms of facial expressions, vocalizations, and physical contact trigger a domino effect of speech and language acquisition and progression....


I think my child has Autism. What Do I do next?
  • Beata Klarowska, M.S. CCC-SLP
  • Monday, July 25, 2011

I think my child has Autism. What Do I do next?

If you suspect that your child has autism and he or she was not diagnosed at school, or is no yet attending school, you should contact a pediatrician to discuss your concern and obtain a referral for evaluation by a child psychologist. If your child attends public school, you should be able to get all of the services through the school. If your child is under the age of three, you should also contact the Regional Center. ...


Dysarthria
  • Beata Klarowska, M.S. CCC-SLP
  • Monday, July 25, 2011

Dysarthria

Dysarthria is a neurogenic motor speech disorder resulting from muscular weakness of the tongue, lips, soft palate, larynx or respiratory muscles . Individuals with dysarthria may exhibit abnormalities in strength, speed, range, tone and accuracy of muscular movements. Dysarthria may affect speech production, voice, respiration and prosody (melody of speech). There are different types of dysarthria. Dysarthria may co-exist with other disorders like apraxia of speech or aphasia (acquired language disorder). ...


Are speech and language the same?
  • Beata Klarowska, M.S. CCC-SLP
  • Monday, July 25, 2011

Are speech and language the same?

Many adults consider speech and language to be the exact same phenomenon. However, professionals, such as speech pathologists, consider speech and language to be two different systems. ...


Apraxia of speech
  • Beata Klarowska, M.S. CCC-SLP
  • Monday, July 25, 2011

Apraxia of speech

Apraxia of speech is a neurogenic motor- speech disorder secondary to damage to the parts of the brain; responsible for motor programming and sequencing. Apraxia of speech does not include muscular weakness, coordination or sensory loss. Facial muscles move but they have difficulty executing the program necessary for appropriate movements/articulatory postures. Individuals with apraxia of speech know what they want to say but have difficulty saying it. ...


Aphasia
  • Beata Klarowska, M.S. CCC-SLP
  • Monday, July 25, 2011

Aphasia

Aphasia is a language disorder acquired secondary to an injury in the part of the brain responsible for language. Aphasia is very often caused by injury to the left hemisphere of the brain. Aphasia affects language comprehension, language production, reading and writing. There are several types of aphasia; the main divisions are fluent and non-fluent aphasia. The severity of aphasia depends on the extent and the location of the brain injury. ...